The Wheat Farmer /
Row Crop Farmer

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Professional Publications for Farmers and Ag Businesses in the Central Plains
Go to The Wheat Farmer / Row Crop Farmer Monthly Newsletter

The Wheat Farmer / Row Crop Farmer Monthly Newsletter

The Wheat Farmer/Row Crop Farmer newsletter is a monthly publication covering crop production information in Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska and Colorado.

Go to Wheat Varieties for Kansas and the Great Plains Annual Book

Wheat Varieties for Kansas and the Great Plains Annual Book

Wheat Varieties for Kansas and the Great Plains has been the annual bible on wheat varieties since 1987. You’ll find objective ratings and yield results on all the current wheat varieties for Kansas, Oklahoma, the Texas Panhandle, southern Nebraska, and eastern Colorado. Our ratings reflect the combined judgments of not just one expert, but of the top public and private wheat breeders, agronomists, and plant pathologists from Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska, and Colorado.

Field Notes

NOVEMBER 2018 CONDITIONS: The 2018 U.S. corn crop yield average could land somewhere around 180bpa—and will be among the highest (if not the highest) yield average ever recorded, with a total crop of 14.6 Billion bushels (possibly the second-highest production year in the U.S.). Meanwhile, the national soybean crop yield average is expected to come in at 52.1bpa, with a total crop of 4.6 Billion bushels amid falling export estimates. The standout yield record will however go to the U.S. sorghum crop, up 13 bushels from last year to 102bpa. Total production rose 32 percent from last year, as did area for harvest (up 15 percent from last year). Later winter wheat planting stalled for rains, while already-planted acres appear to be do- ing well with abundant moisture. A cold snap November 10-12 may have affected newly planted wheat—varying by particular field conditions. K-State Specialists said damage could range from None to Some injury when air temperatures dropped from 55-60°F to about 20°F. Consequences depend on soil moisture, which was good across the region, and acted as a thermal buffer. Soil temperatures did not fall below 33°F across Kansas, though Northwest Kansas wheat would have been more vulnerable following emergence.

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